SmokeJumper on Taking Risks in the MMO Industry

Written by Feldon on . Posted in Commentary

In response to a thread asking the perennial question “Is the MMO Genre Dying?“, SmokeJumper had some comments that may resonate with readers who have tried, or plan to try some of the new concept MMOs on the near horizon:

I think the main problem with most MMOs today is lack of imagination and fear of failure.

Individual developers at any given company have slews of good, innovative ideas. However, what matters is what the person that signs the check will authorize…and that involves risk assessment.

So yeah, we have a few models out there of “chase loot, get check” that work really well. So everyone starts making their games do exactly that as the only main goal. Thus, we’ve trained our own players to do only one thing.

Well, bad on us. But we’re reaping what we sowed.

That being said, the reverse is true. Once you start playing a game, you don’t really want it to morph into another completely different game over time, because you fell in love with the original game…not this new one. (And yes, we’ve done our share of that morphing ourselves. We’re changing that approach to our games now.)

So, MMOs are not dying. However, players that have played those MMOs many times over many years are…surprise, surprise…tired of playing that particular game model. They want something new.

So, enter the new breed. Things like Tera and GW2. They’re trying new ideas. Maybe they work, maybe they don’t, but no one has hit it out of the park yet. We all know…feel in our bones…that change has to occur and we’re all working toward new ways of doing things.

Part of that is gameplay. Part of it is business. And part is something no one has seen yet. EQN is where we take our theories and practice and combine them into the form of something new.

But no way is the genre dead. That’s like the rumors of “the PC is a dying platform”. It’s just not true. We do nothing but grow because people like being around other people.

Georgeson also made a point of reiterating that while EQNext will be different from EQ2, it will not be “simpler”.

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Comments (51)

  • JesDyr

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    replace simpler with cheaper

    Reply

  • Mentalepsy

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    “Once you start playing a game, you don’t really want it to morph into another completely different game over time, because you fell in love with the original game… not this new one.”

    How timely. My guild and I are finally calling it quits for exactly this reason. Much of what we used to love about EQ2 has been neglected or outright ruined over the years. GU63 and the events that followed swiftly killed our remaining enthusiasm.

    It’s a shame, because for me, at least, there is no clear replacement for EQ2. I’ve been searching for one for years, and I have yet to find it.

    Reply

  • bhagpuss

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    “That’s like the rumors of “the PC is a dying platform”. It’s just not true.”

    I’d be astounded if the PC in the form of a big box that sits by a desk is around in ten years time. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if it was out of manufacture as new product in five.

    That, of course, doesn’t mean PC-style games are dying. Just that I imagine we’ll be playing them on hardware that looks nothing like a PC.

    Reply

  • Ragefighter

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    hopefully EQN will be that replacement…

    I played pretty hardcore form launch until the end of T7.
    played casually in between

    When I came back to full time back in late 2010/Jan 2011 the amount of changes that were made to basic stuff such as loot, stats, used to be you bid on generic loot with stats that could potentially help anyone, moved on to sets in kos/eof (liked them, different classes actually looked different), you would need to have back up/resist armor and repair kits and potions for mana and resists and all this stuff was important back than. now there are like only a handful of stats that mean anything most don’t mean anything cause they are all perma capped or useless.
    resists are just a joke now.
    with the amount of mender bots there is no reason to even have armor dmg for the most part…

    AND somehow even when I used to carry all that stuff, I had more room in my bags than I do right now. =p and my bags are like twice the size now. lol

    /end rant
    sorry i’m just a bitter eq2 player =|

    Reply

  • Steve

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    WoW killed the MMO genre. Every company wants to be just like WoW or their shareholders do anyway. Until WoW goes away the future of the genre which looked so great back in the late 2000s is bleak.

    Reply

  • Ritten

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    I’d be astounded if the PC in the form of a big box that sits by a desk is around in ten years time.

    People have been saying that for over 20 years now. Just saying…

    Reply

  • baddabing

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    Smoke Jumper has got many valid points but lack of content is whats hurting eq2.

    Your ability to personalize your char’s with different stats has been removed and now u feel like a clone.

    Small things in life are often the best. Buying ammo every 3 hours isn’t one of these things. Fix the issue before it really gets crazy.

    Sc market place has been made void for most players other then vit and exp pots. why remove subs and X Pac’s take away double sc.

    Make ingame trading of Sc cards for plat safe for both sides buyer and seller.

    just a few thoughts

    Reply

  • Flatley

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    Not just lack of content. Last years’ “hack”, P7S1 and GW2 are hurting it as well.

    Reply

  • Lath

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    As long as people with no skill but monay (friend/relation/family) take all important decision, no one single game can be good.

    Expert are just a tools mostly ignored, while they should be the leader.

    All we have at best are game where a huge amount of cash got invested for Look good like Mass effect or diablo 3 … but they are really far to be really good.

    Games are diyng only due to that, make quality and it will be a success. Stop to think with dollars in eyes, and work hard. The dollars will follow.

    Change a game is a huge mistake. A game must have an identity and dont change Really.

    People who put monay in project should only have one signle right, pay and shut up. let pro do the job and wait.

    Reply

  • Kruzzen

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    In my opinion it is not lack of content that is hurting EQ. It is not listening to the players. I have never seen someone get mad when there are honest to goodness improvements to the game. What I have seen has always revolved around SOE botching one thing or another and then ignoring the players input on how to make it work. It is sad because people in eq are the most dedicated customers I know. Most industries would kill to have that type of loyalty base.

    Reply

  • Grebo

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    I’ve been in EQ2 since beta, I miss an adverage of about 2 weeks a year to go on family holiday. I’ve seen things come, I’ve seen things go. I’ve heard mostly empty promises, lingering bug problems that never get fixed and flat out hot air from our ‘friends’ at SOE.

    I realize that you can not possibly make a game that everyone will agree upon or like, that is why there are so many out there to choose from, so no the MMORPG is not ‘dying’ or going away.

    I plod along in EQ2 doing things that I need to do to grow my toons and my guild, I do not worry about the content changing, it doesn’t matter if we do. It is SOE’s sandbox and we are just guests in it, they will tell us how it will be.

    So what is killing on line games and MMORPG’s? Companies that treat their users like idiots, tell us they are listening when quite clearly they are not. Give us a sucker (mini in game games – really?) to take our attention away from what really needs to be fixed or addressed. To blow smoke(jumper) up our back sides and expect us to go along.

    As a base game, EQ2 is one of the best out there. I am happy with EQ2 as a genrie, a playable game and it’s loaded with pretty good content over all. So I stay and do my crafting dailies, maybe a little adventuring here and there. I’ve stopped raiding all together as the agrovation of unfixed bugs just took the fun out of it. I play EQ2 for fun and entertainment, I’m happy it is at least a 90% functional game – I believe alot of the other 10% could be fixed if time was spent looking at the game as whole, not as a current expansion or most complained about raid zone.

    All in all – listen to your community SOE, sure there will always be things that can not be done, some things just never seem to fix. Be honest and tell us that, we gave it a shot but the damn thing just won’t fix. you lose folks due to dishonesty and or out right cruelty (I’ve seen more than my share of encounters with CSR’s turn nasty because the CSR came in nasty and hard – fix it Brasse)we all have bad days at work, but if you continue to anger your paying customers – they are going to become other peoples customers – dispite how good your product may be over their product.

    Reply

  • camelotcrusade

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    Realizing you have a problem is the first step towards correcting it. I’m glad to hear at least one game designer talking about the fact that many of today’s MMOs feel “same old, same old” because they stick to tried-and-true models. I definitely felt fatigue faster than I thought I would with RIFT and SWTOR for that reason.

    I wonder how many (spectacular?) failures are due before investors are willing to back more risks?

    Reply

  • Atan

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    I’m afraid they wont back more risks, they’ll just stop backing MMO development.

    Its my prediction that within a couple years there will only be 2-3 companies still trying to work in this marketplace.

    The cost to develop, compared to those willing to invest, is just going to dry up the market.

    We’ll see more resources put into multi-player console titles.

    Reply

  • uncle

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    @atan

    We’ll see more resources put into multi-player console titles.

    i dont think so cause SE ffxi and ffxiv which are two of the most utilized ps2/ps3/xbox mmos and they have already said they plan on phasing out the use of those systems with there mmo’s cause they can not utilize what they have to offer fully atm.

    Reply

  • striinger

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    I wouldn’t bet against the PC anytime soon.

    EQ2 probably suffers from having too much content and options than not enough. It’s counterproductive to try to create something that is all things to all people. The cost to maintain so much and remain focused on purpose is to high. It’s the reason you don’t see many I Italian Japanese seafood steakhouse Mexican French pastry variety restaurants that also sell spring goods and furniture. They’d fail because the cost to be good at it all its more than people would pay to eat and shop there.
    The EQ2 team suffers from strategic focus or their strategy is to have no focus. Either way, it’s a clear case of over committing.
    It’s Holly who had to sink our swim, now, but Dave threw her in the pool wearing lead underwear. Only time will tell if EQN suffers from the same lack of focus, bit I wouldn’t be surprised.

    Reply

  • Common Sense

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    bhagpuss
    August 30, 2012 @ 6:28 am

    “That’s like the rumors of “the PC is a dying platform”. It’s just not true.”

    I’d be astounded if the PC in the form of a big box that sits by a desk is around in ten years time. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if it was out of manufacture as new product in five.

    Ummm do you even know how PC’s are built? I don’t even buy from a vendor, I build all my PC’s. The term pc means Personal Computer. As long as computers are around, a personal one that can easily be customized will.

    Reply

  • Caudate

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    Yea. What we really need is more time in crafting design and voice over’s for our characters. That’s why we really play MMORPG’s, especially Everquest II. We sure as hell know it’s not for content, as it’s been broken for the last few years without any real effort put in to fix it.

    Reply

  • Common Sense

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    Also reading Smoker Jumper’s comment I cant help but drop my jaw. It’s like failing on a college group project because one person in your group didn’t do his part. And the next day he comes in lecturing others or gives his advice on the subject in class. It’s like you’re thinking “what? you got some nerve talking, you didn’t do your part!”

    And that’s how I feel about SJ. The game right now is in dire need of balancing. He ignores it, all subjects having to do with balancing, itemization, content, and gameplay. Before you open your mouth, fix the game first.

    Reply

  • Firekeeper

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    The problem with the EQ2 community is that it does not often want to try new things. Raiders simply want to get on the gear treadmill. Each expansion raid up for new gear. Like this is not a time sync and easy for devs to pump out.

    The covette is that many players a sick and tired of this model and ARE looking for newer features and newer models.

    Reply

  • Electri

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    The SoE party-line answer to all your posts is….

    “We truly appreciate all of you input. We are currently looking into may of the things you have mentioned. We will be working hard to create better, new, and more exciting content.”

    Damn, I should be their speech writer! LOL

    SJ, if you want to see where the problem begins and ends….carefully read all the comments above about fixes that never occured, broken items, what you wrote about things you loved about EQ, continuous rebalancing/stats on gear, and finally…….look in the mirror.

    Reply

  • badcat

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    I find what smokejumper said to be funny. As they sure not learned their lesson.

    We tried to add everything including the kitchen sink to EQ2, group finder, and all that other jaz, and none of it has worked. So the bs of statement of “That being said, the reverse is true. Once you start playing a game, you don’t really want it to morph into another completely different game over time, because you fell in love with the original game…not this new one. (And yes, we’ve done our share of that morphing ourselves. We’re changing that approach to our games now.)”

    Since when are we not doing that to eq2, all of last year up until the past couple of months we been adding stuff from other games and failing with it.

    He is right about one thing we don’t want it to morp into another game we want it to stay special. They sure in the world did not listen to his words now, and they could have already learned that from swg when the nge hit. They still continue to add junk to eq2 that nobody wants.

    All in all it comes down to one thing, lack of listing to your player base. Instead we got group finder, dungion finder, public quests, a revamp to quenos and to freeport that noboby wanted and they continue to remove old content and put in week content. No leasons learned in imho.

    Reply

  • camelotcrusade

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    @ Striinger very insightful comment. But then it leads me to wonder… well, what are old MMOs supposed to do to keep players engaged if they don’t add new content? And if they only added contet along a very narrow focus then wouldn’t another flavor of the same-old stuff eventually fail to appeal? Wouldn’t they have to expand their scope at some point?

    Perhaps the biggest problem is that until MMOs came out all video games had a fixed lifespan. Sure, you might replay something a few months or years later, but MMOs were supposed to played continuously (which justified a recurring subscription cost).

    Reply

  • XK

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    I do think the fact is that it’s hard to keep an MMO fresh after a # of years. Any gear-focused MMO either has to keep shifting the paradigm (you needed those states, but now instead you need these stats), or face rampant mudflation.

    In a PvE environment, it’s hard (imo) to keep the game interesting to the playerbase. You have to continuously offer new carrots (either levels, gear, or content), but players devour it so quickly that it’s difficult to satiate them while still maintaining any sense of vision.

    PvP games are better in this respect, because the players help become the content, and that content is a lot more dynamic than anything the developers will create. (Just look at a game like EVE, where virtually ever story of note has to do with something some player (or group of such) did to another player) But a lot of people don’t like PvP.

    I feel like the MMO landscape and customer-base has shifted for good. I do think the new reality is that of F2P MMO-hoppers… people who cycle between multiple MMOs whenever new content is made available. I think brand loyalties like SOE enjoyed with EQ1/2 or Blizzard enjoyed (for the most part) with WOW are a thing of the past.

    Reply

  • ab

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    “@atan

    We’ll see more resources put into multi-player console titles.

    i dont think so cause SE ffxi and ffxiv which are two of the most utilized ps2/ps3/xbox mmos and they have already said they plan on phasing out the use of those systems with there mmo’s cause they can not utilize what they have to offer fully atm.”

    You are wrong on multiple fronts.

    a) Atan wasn’t referring to MMOs, he meant companies will focus more on regular multiplayer online games.
    b) FFXI continues to receive support for PS2 and Xbox 360. The new expansion is not being released for the PS2 in the US, but will be available for the PS2 in Japan.
    c) FFXIV isn’t even a “PS2/PS3/Xbox 360″ MMO at this point, so no idea why you included it. The original engine was a complete pile of shit (as was the whole game, really) and had to be redone so that it could actually scale down for consoles. The producer of FFXIV has said that the engine will also scale up for future consoles, as well.

    Reply

  • zerigo

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    Typical SoE damage control. Ya were listening, and ya we play this pos too.

    Loved this quote “Maybe they work, maybe they don’t, but no one has hit it out of the park yet”. Except for wow, who probably made more in 1 year then SoE could in 10. Due to their massive advertising campaigns, sporting celebrities from multiple genres. Surely their success was not based on game play.

    Reply

  • Dark

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    They’re right, no one has hit it out of the park yet, and the genre will continue dying until someone decides to take a risk and make it work. Hopefully TES:O will accomplish that with the game riding on the success of Skyrim.

    Reply

  • milliebii

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    hated Skyrim, thinly disguised console game sold as a PC game. I want more than that in an MMORPG, like first person role playing, my what an orginal idea that would be.

    Reply

  • Dark

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    Console game..? You’re joking? It was as much of a PC game as the other 4 o.O

    The Elder Scrolls kind of defines what a PC game is in an RPG does it not? I don’t think I’ve ever heard someone say it was a console game especially with how much Bethesda supports the modding community. Oh well. :\

    Reply

  • Daalilama

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    How bout smokejumper take a serious risk and fix eq2 since they broke or ignored problems for years now…as for next who cares most of us will prob not play it.

    Reply

  • Madcat

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    When they talk about risk, it’s thing like RMAH from diablo 3… short work for massing incoming.
    Or take a skin from the game change the color and sell it 10 dollars, hoping it will sell a lot.
    Yes there is a risk… for the long term.

    Or put new feature again and again, and forget them as soon as they are live, never update any…. it’s also a part of this risk

    this risk can be resume in one single thing…. No real work is done for quality. And it’s a RISK.

    Reply

  • Gaealiege

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    While it takes a few seconds to register your English, Lath, I agree with you point.

    The problems we’re seeing in the gaming world in general is that dollars became the goal rather than creating a game. Go back to the NES/SNES model were tons of independent developers put out games simply because they thought “what the hell let’s try this; I love these things.” I notice independent development has become more prevalent in PSN/XboxLive, but those games are bordering on Farmville level worthlessness. Someone independently make me Elder Scrolls Arena or Daggerfall again, and I’ll loyally follow your company for decades. Someone please make something high quality.

    Reply

  • Modus

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    The death of MMORGPs will come from you, the developers, your investors and the pursuit of the dollar.

    I started in EQ1 in greater fay, a small naked wood-elf with no idea that i would be investing the next 10 years of my life to this fascinatingly simple yet addictive idea of power. Levels, gear, creating a name for myself amongst thousands of other players all after the same goal. The world was big, scary and didn’t give you a single break, yet every night there i was grinding away, making new friends and sharing the joys and sorrows of Norrath with them.

    Eventually news of a shiny new adventure was on its way in the form of EQ2, I was sold before I’d even seen a screenshot. Day one and my new addiction was set, a back story for my character, the world was shattered an i was on the path to help create order in the chaos. Amazing Voice overs, cut-scenes and new friends and enemies to conquer fueled the next 4 years of my life.

    Little did i know that the people that had created this flawed but charming world would be set upon by an unbeatable foe. The investors had seen the money to be made with micro transactions and where hungry for a piece of the proverbial pie. No longer would our offerings of $14.99 a month slate their thirst…And so the marketplace was born.

    The game had changed though few realized, the slope was steep and there was no turning back. Cutting costs, maximizing profits and attracting new money was the goal, and so EQ2 looked to its competitors and following suit went F2P.

    With that final nail they forever changed, turning their backs on the noble pursuit found in the adventures of their beginnings and instead they place all their skills and devotions to the pursuit of the dollar.

    And so Mr. Smokejumper. You say they are dying, well the poisoned knife is in your hands and the hands of all those devoted to the greed inherent in the system. EQN could save the genre with the joy and passion that created its forbears, go back to your roots, create the world the genre deserves.
    A world of adventure.

    Reply

  • Vortix

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    Gaealiege, that’s a fairly high bar to reach. Your wanting an independent individual that wants to create a fun game without the backing of a producer to be burdened without funding while developing in complex 3D.

    There are too many skills required for a single person to take on. You need a game engine, someone to tailor that engine, artists, musical scores, as well as a storyboard (or lack thereof). That takes a team of talented individuals. While someone might be able to scrape by with something passable, like Minecraft, I have doubts that the property may not eventually be sold off to begin work on other projects, or else not gaining your ‘loyally for decades’ promise due to some outstanding issues from having such a small team.

    People still need to eat.

    Reply

  • Dark

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    and yet Frictional games has accomplished basically what Gaealiege described for the survival horror genre, they revived it fairly well with Penumbra and Amnesia.

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  • Gaealiege

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    And I own both of those games, Dark. Two games however won’t sustain me.

    Reply

  • Gaealiege

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    I understand it’s a complex undertaking, but simply put the majority of games now are the Ford Focus painted a different color. They’re all pretty terrible.

    Bethesda has had my loyalty since Arena. Until they pull something idiotic like selling to EA, they’ll maintain that loyalty.

    Reply

  • Gaealiege

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    We originally had tons of companies appear, so I don’t see the issue today with the same setup. There are plenty of engines that exist, which are entirely free to use, and only require you giving a percent profit to the creators if you commercialize the product (Unreal Engines for instance).

    I want to play Interplay, Bethesda, Black Isle Studios/Bioware, Squaresoft games. I don’t have a drop of time for the fad era Atari, Activision, EA, SquareEnix, Konami, or Capcom Coach purse quality games. How is it that there isn’t a market for real gaming any longer? I’m baffled. If the production cost for a quality game is higher, charge me more. I’ll pay for the luxury of quality and they can continue to sell crap to the masses. I help allow this entire genre to exist by funding it from the beginning and I cannot help but become a little sad when I feel like the industry no longer cares about us, Original Gamers.

    Reply

  • Dark

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    I wasn’t saying that to you, I was using Frictional as an example that indie devs can produce good quality games that aren’t Minecraft. :)

    Reply

  • striinger

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    @Camel
    When car sales competition increases they don’t try to figure out how to make their cars into better lawn mowers. They find ways to make a car better at the things we buy cars for (e.g. Comfortably moving me from point A to B while looking good) and reducing the stuff we don’t like about it (e.g. Cost a lot of gas, pollute the planet, fall apart). When people no longer want to drive a big gas sucking V12 fun mobile, then they come out with new models to better fit the bill. Sometimes they may adapt new tech to reduce to stuff you don’t like, but the purpose for the car is the same (e.g. Make an electric Ferrari if you want but it had better still look and drive like a Ferrari).
    If EQ2 isn’t what people want, then turning out into an arcade of mini games is not going to save it. New content is great so long as it’s EQ2 content. To do something else to draw in new players is pointless. You’re drawing them in with bolt on features to a game they won’t really like to play.

    Reply

  • striinger

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    @Modus
    Dramatize much? It’s still a game, oh ye of great virtual stature. :-)

    Reply

  • Zapphod

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    Personally what I find lacking in MMO’s is depth and to date only two MMO’s have managed to produce depth in any meaningful way UO with the ability to make your character anything you want when you want and SWG who actually produced a world where you actually needed social classes and dedicated crafting classes.

    If I was making an MMO it would probably consist of Tera’s combat, EQ2′s interface, WoW’s PvP systems, SWG’s trade skills, harvesting and social classes, EQ1′s atmosphere (who can forget the sound of a skeleton in Kithicor forest)and EQ1′s land mass all with photo-realistic graphics.

    Reply

  • Flatley

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    As an aside… I used to play a text-only MUD. The “graphics” and “music” were all inside my head and story lines developed with player interaction and role playing. And that took place inside the game or via RP forums, not via MOD’s creating content.

    I’m not saying it was better or worse than what we have now but, for me, it was certainly more immersive.

    Reply

  • melpheos

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    I think they should get rid of the x4 raids all along as it’s oriented to a very limited population and developpers have to spend too much time on a content that will not be touched by 98% (figure taken out from my ass) of the playerbase.
    x2 raid can be handled by pug and also obviously by raid guild. x4 cannot be handled by pug and allmost always fails because they obviously do not gather people who are ready to face the numerous wipes.
    The time spent on developping good accessible x2 raid would be well spent.

    Reply

  • Rugrat

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    Modus is spot on!

    They can have and make all the money they want from the add-ons and micro trans and still breathe new life into the genre.

    Over the last decade, they have created enormous amounts of lore. But now they are actually neglecting the storylines and worse, they are adapting them to fit their new commercial model – that is what is killing the game.

    If they remained true to the story and fitted the bolt ons around it, they would no longer have the tail wagging the dog but a real ‘never-ending story’

    In short any strategy they had in place for the game has been replaced by their commercial strat. If they keep going this way, it will die.

    Funny thing is that communities across the whole genre are saying the same things in different ways. They don’t mind all this commercial noise too much as long as new life continues to breath in THEIR game.

    Developers should really put down their calculators and spreadsheets for a month and actually listen.

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  • Rugrat

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    Flatley said “As an aside… I used to play a text-only MUD. The “graphics” and “music” were all inside my head and story lines developed with player interaction and role playing. And that took place inside the game or via RP forums, not via MOD’s creating content.

    I’m not saying it was better or worse than what we have now but, for me, it was certainly more immersive.

    So true, I had the same experience with the original Wizardry. I dread to think what it will be like when it gets released.

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  • Kwill

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    This weekend, I took advantage of the fact that you can use the dungeon finder to get groups in bonus exp dungeons with just a merc (forget about getting a real player in there, that part is completely non-fucntional in the community). Unfortunately, there is a bug in DF — what a surprise — that results in getting the “dungeon abandoner” message at the end of the dungeon (“you abandoned your group! {shame tone}.) I petitioned it; I got a very quick response saying yes we know and we don’t know when it will be fixed. I just had to laugh, so typical of EQ2 today. Broken content with a NEW feature, that doesn’t work for the community anyway, and now is bugged. I think that’s indicative of what’s going on with the game. “Innovation” (copied from other titles) but no substance behind it, roll it out and then let it stay broken. The devs need to ask themselves, why is DF a complete failure? What about the community aren’t we understanding? Or is the fact that it’s not technically viable the way it’s been built?

    The genre isn’t dead, but if you can’t make it work, it’s flailing around and going nowhere. Make the game features work. It’s still fun, but you have to put the effort into making the new content you introduced have some utility, and not give up when the toy is broken.

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  • Vortix

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    Kwill, their immediate concerns are in creating new ways to make money, like SC gambling, than they are at squashing bugs and improving the user experience. Of course, I blame that on a small development team under the lead boot of corporate values.

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  • Onorem

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    Go away SmokeJumper. Leave eq2 alone. Produce the garbage that eqnext will be and stop ruining this game more than you already have. Just. Go. Away.

    Reply

  • Willlow

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    I wouldn’t be surprised to see a very ‘risky’ innovative MMO from kickstarter being set up in the future.

    There are tons of kickstarter games in dev that would NEVER be financed by the big publishers because they are not flavor of the month, super microtransaction yearly COD offering types.

    Reply

  • Salty21db

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    Well let us remember that the initial “risk” for the EQ franchise was by Verant (I’m certain we all know just reminding) and that these aren’t the same people who took the beginning risk lol.

    I started the post in hopes to remind them that sometimes risks need to be taken. In fact it’s one of the main rules in business that normally the higher the risk the bigger reward if it works….along with longevity > burst cashcow…just saying.

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  • Alacus

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    Another reason people dont play EQ2 is not everyone has a decent machine to play games on. you can buy an xbox or playstation 3 for about £200. a decent gaming machine will set you back £400-£900 just for the base unit. factor in monitor, mouse and keyboard, speakers, headset, webcam (SOEmote. I know, LOL)you are talking about £600-£1200 for a half decent setup. so remember that when you talk about why not many people play the game. some people cant afford a decent machine

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